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Five Effective Strategies to Improve Your VA Rating for Depression

Five Effective Strategies to Improve Your VA Rating for Depression

Depression is a mental health condition that can affect anyone, including military veterans. Research studies have found that approximately one in five veterans who have served in combat zones experience symptoms of depression or PTSD. Furthermore, veterans with a history of multiple deployments, combat exposure, or traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at a higher risk for depression. It’s important to seek help if you experience any of the common signs and symptoms of depression, as it can lead to suicide. The VA offers various mental health services, including therapy, medication management, and peer support, to help veterans manage their depression. Remember, seeking help is a sign of strength, and you’re not alone.

If you’re a veteran looking to improve your VA disability rating for depression in less time, check out our Top 5 Tips to help you get the rating you have earned. This Guide provides valuable information on the general rating scale for mental health conditions and research studies about Veterans and Depression. Remember, the severity of your symptoms determines your VA rating for depression, which can range from 0% to 100%, with breaks at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. By following our tips and seeking help, you can increase your chances of receiving the proper VA disability rating for depression.

 

COMMON SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION IN VETERANS

The Mayo Clinic has outlined common signs and symptoms of Depression in Veterans include some or all the following:

  • Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness, or hopelessness
  • Angry outbursts, irritability or frustration, even over small matters
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in most or all normal activities, such as sex, hobbies or sports
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia or sleeping too much
  • Tiredness and lack of energy, so even small tasks take extra effort
  • Reduced appetite and weight loss or increased cravings for food and weight gain
  • Anxiety, agitation or restlessness
  • Slowed thinking, speaking or body movements
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures or self-blame
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions and remembering things
  • Frequent or recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts or suicide
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches

 

Clinical Depression can severely impact the day-to-day activities of many Veterans, including work, school, social activities, and relationships. Unfortunately, many veterans suffer in silence, feeling alone in their struggles. However, it’s essential to remember that you are not alone, and seeking help is a sign of strength. Your life matters, and there is support available to help you manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life.

 

depression seeking help

 

VA DISABILITY RATINGS FOR DEPRESSION

 

Major Depressive Disorder VA Rating Criteria Depression VA Ratings
Total occupational and social impairment, due to such symptoms as: gross impairment in thought processes or communication; persistent delusions or hallucinations; grossly inappropriate behavior; persistent danger of hurting self or others; intermittent inability to perform activities of daily living (including maintenance of minimal personal hygiene); disorientation to time or place; memory loss for names of close relatives, own occupation, or own name. 100%
Occupational and social impairment, with deficiencies in most areas, such as work, school, family relations, judgment, thinking, or mood, due to such symptoms as: suicidal ideation; obsessional rituals which interfere with routine activities; speech intermittently illogical, obscure, or irrelevant; near-continuous panic or depression affecting the ability to function independently, appropriately and effectively; impaired impulse control (such as unprovoked irritability with periods of violence); spatial disorientation; neglect of personal appearance and hygiene; difficulty in adapting to stressful circumstances (including work or a worklike setting); inability to establish and maintain effective relationships. 70%
Occupational and social impairment with reduced reliability and productivity due to such symptoms as: flattened affect; circumstantial, circumlocutory, or stereotyped speech; panic attacks more than once a week; difficulty in understanding complex commands; impairment of short- and long-term memory (e.g., retention of only highly learned material, forgetting to complete tasks); impaired judgment; impaired abstract thinking; disturbances of motivation and mood; difficulty in establishing and maintaining effective work and social relationships. 50%
Occupational and social impairment with occasional decrease in work efficiency and intermittent periods of inability to perform occupational tasks (although generally functioning satisfactorily, with routine behavior, self-care, and conversation normal), due to such symptoms as: depressed mood, anxiety, suspiciousness, panic attacks (weekly or less often), chronic sleep impairment, mild memory loss (such as forgetting names, directions, recent events). 30%
Occupational and social impairment due to mild or transient symptoms which decrease work efficiency and ability to perform occupational tasks only during periods of significant stress, or symptoms controlled by continuous medication. 10%
A mental condition has been formally diagnosed, but symptoms are not severe enough either to interfere with occupational and social functioning or to require continuous medication. 0%

 

VA RATINGS FOR DEPRESSION AND THEIR CORRESPONDING SYMPTOMS:

0% VA Rating for Mild Depression

If you have been diagnosed with mild depression, your symptoms are not severe enough to interfere with your daily functioning or require continuous medication. You may experience occasional feelings of sadness or hopelessness, but they do not significantly impact your work or social life.

 

10% VA Rating for Mild to Moderate Depression

If you have a rating of 10%, you may experience mild to moderate symptoms of depression, which may affect your work efficiency and ability to perform occupational tasks during periods of significant stress. You may take medication to manage your symptoms, which may be under control most of the time. However, you may experience occasional bouts of depression.

 

30% VA Rating for Moderate Depression

If you have a rating of 30%, your symptoms are more significant and may include depressed mood, anxiety, panic attacks, sleep disturbances, and mild memory loss. You may experience occasional periods of inability to perform occupational tasks or decreased work efficiency, but you can still function normally in routine behavior, self-care, and conversation.

 

50%  VA Rating for Severe Depression

If you have a rating of 50%, your symptoms may be more severe and may include flattened affect, speech difficulties, impaired judgment and abstract thinking, and disturbances in motivation and mood. You may also have trouble with your relationships, including difficulty establishing and maintaining effective work and social relationships. You may experience panic attacks more than once a week and have difficulty understanding complex commands.

 

70% VA Rating for Very Severe Depression

If you have a rating of 70%, your symptoms are very severe and may include suicidal ideation, obsessive rituals, near-continuous panic or depression that affects your ability to function independently, impaired impulse control, and neglect of personal hygiene and appearance. You may also have difficulty adapting to stressful circumstances, including work or work-like settings, and be unable to establish and maintain effective relationships.

 

100% Percent VA Rating for Major Depression

If you have a rating of 100%, your symptoms are the most severe and may include gross impairment in thought processes or communication, persistent delusions or hallucinations, grossly inappropriate behavior, and a persistent danger of hurting yourself or others. You may have intermittent inability to perform activities of daily living, such as minimal personal hygiene or disorientation to time or place. You may experience severe memory loss, including forgetting the names of close relatives, your own occupation, or even your own name.

 

VA DISABILITY RATING FOR DEPRESSION: KEY CONSIDERATIONS

 

VA Disability Rating for Depression

 

One of the most common misconceptions among veterans seeking a VA disability rating for depression is that they must experience all of the subjective symptoms associated with a particular rating criteria in order to qualify for that rating.

This is simply not true.

The VA’s Rating Veteran Service Representative (RVSR) will assess all available evidence and typically assign a rating for depression based on the preponderance of the symptoms.

For example, if a veteran exhibits three symptoms from the 50 rating for depression and five symptoms from the 70 percent rating for depression, the RVSR will generally assign the higher rating unless there is evidence to the contrary.

Conversely, if a veteran experiences five symptoms from the 30 rating for depression and only three symptoms from the 50 rating for depression, the RVSR will generally assign the lower rating unless there is evidence to the contrary.

Under CFR 38, Part 4, Schedule for Rating Disabilities, Paragraph §4.126, the RVSR must follow two key rules when evaluating disability related to mental disorders:

In assessing mental health symptoms, the RVSR must consider the frequency, severity, and duration of psychiatric symptoms, as well as the length of remissions and the veteran’s capacity for adjustment during those periods of remission.

The RVSR must base their evaluation on all available evidence of record that pertains to occupational and social impairment, rather than relying solely on the examiner’s assessment of the level of disability at the time of the examination.

When assessing the level of disability related to depression, the RVSR must take into account the extent of social impairment, but must not assign a rating based solely on social impairment.

By following these key considerations, the RVSR can accurately evaluate the veteran’s level of disability and assign an appropriate rating for depression.

 

CAN DEPRESSION BE CONSIDERED A VA DISABILITY?

Yes, Depression is recognized by the VA as a disability that can qualify for compensation. The level of compensation can vary from 0 to 100 percent, and is determined by the frequency, severity, and duration of symptoms. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of 31 mental health conditions that the VA recognizes as potentially related to military service, making it eligible for VA disability compensation under federal law.

 

HERE ARE SOME FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT VA RATING FOR DEPRESSION

Q: How does the VA determine the rating for Depression?

A: The VA will consider all the evidence of record and normally assign the rating that includes the “preponderance of the symptoms.” The frequency, severity, and duration of psychiatric symptoms, the length of remissions, and the veteran’s capacity for adjustment during periods of remission will also be taken into consideration.

Q: Do I need to have all the symptoms to qualify for a certain rating?

A: No, you do not need to meet all the subjective symptoms tied with a certain rating criterion for Depression in order to get that rating. The VA will consider all the evidence of record and normally assign the rating that includes the “preponderance of the symptoms.”

Q: What if I have symptoms from multiple rating criteria?

A: If a veteran has symptoms from multiple rating criteria, the VA will assign the higher rating unless evidence of record contradicts this subjective assessment.

Q: Can I receive a lower rating if I have some symptoms from a higher rating criterion?

A: Yes, if a veteran has symptoms from a lower rating criterion and some symptoms from a higher rating criterion, the VA will assign the lower rating unless evidence of record contradicts this subjective assessment.

Q: Can I receive Special Monthly Compensation for Depression?

A:Yes, if you meet the criteria for Category S, such as being completely and permanently housebound due to service-connected conditions or having another condition rated 60% or a group of conditions rated 60%

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